Translate

30 December 2009

FROGS: A CHORUS OF COLORS; JUMP TO SEE IT!

Visiting the web site "Frogs: A Chorus of Colors" is a delightful experience, like the actual exhibition itself held at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) for the last days (up to January 3rd, 2010).


Enter this web site to enjoy the diversity of frogs and to feed your knowledge on this interesting and threatened group of vertebrates.

The site includes a beautiful series of frogs  (mostly tropical), part of a large collection that includes more than 70 frog species at the exhibition. Through a collection of live-pictured specimens, the web site teaches you  through tips on aspects like amphibian evolution, reproduction, ecology facts, global declines, details on morphology, and much, much more. Enhance your knowledge on frogs by also reading a large list of “frog fun facts”.

To learn more, visit the section on the herpetological holdings at the AMNH, and the research that is or has been carried out by the museum around the World (mostly on tropical countries).

Do not miss a terrarium with a real-time live web cam, where you can see frogs in action. And to close your multimedia experience, listen to the calls of different tropical frog species. This site is a must for frog lovers!

20 December 2009

May 2010 Course: Species Monitoring and Conservation




Location: National Zoo's Conservation and Research Center, Front Royal, Virginia, USA.
Dates: 16-28 May 2010.


Subject: Latest methodologies and approaches to biodiversity assessment and monitoring with a special emphasis on amphibians.
Topics:
  • Field assessment and monitoring techniques such as call surveys, artificial cover, drift fences and pitfall, mark and recaptures, transects and plots, and larvae surveys.
  • Amphibian identification, taxonomy, and collection.
  • Captive breeding and animal husbandry.
  • Wildlife toxicology.
  • Disease and pathology.
  • Genetics.

Amphibians and Reptiles of Northeast India



A photographic guide to the herpetofauna of Northeast India, part of the Indo-Burma Biodiversity hotspot. The book covers more than 100 species with more than 250 photographs. Taxa covered:
  • 29 amphibians
  • 1 crocodile (gharial)
  • 21 fresh water turtles and tortoises
  • 29 snakes
  • 23 lizards 
The guide includes a snake-bite section, as well as data on geographic distribution, natural history, taxonomic characters useful for identification, and conservation status of the herp species.
For more information, and to order copies of the book, visit: Aaranyak

19 December 2009

BOOK ON THE AMPHIBIANS OF THE KAIETEUR NATIONAL PARK, GUYANA

Likely, this is the most complete guide to the amphibian fauna for a tropical protected area. This book covers 48 species of frogs, toads and caecilians living in the Kaieteur National Park (Guyana).


Each of the species is beautifully illustrated with pictures of the live animal, and plates pointing to distinguishing features that facilitates field identification. The vast majority of the species also has color illustrations showing oscillograms and spectrograms of advertisement calls.


A complete fully illustrated section is devoted to key features of adult and larval stages, which is the most complete and detailed modern guide on external morphological characteristics for amphibian species, of ample utility to workers in other tropical places.


The book also provides useful information on methods and techniques to perform taxonomic studies, surpassing the usual information on collecting, preserving and gathering data on the specimens, to offer valuable data and tips on personal equipment to carry to the field, photography, recording of calls, and much more.

This book will be the delight of professionals, students and lay people alike, and a “jewel book” to collectors.

To order the book or to download low and high resolution pdfs, go to : Abc Taxa

14 December 2009

700 VISITS!

THANKS FOR READING THE BLOG.  WE NOW REACHED 700 VISITORS!Preserve biodiversity!

2010 the International Year of Biodiversity



Amphibians and reptiles losses in the last decades are just part of a biodiversity crisis affecting the World. Habitat destruction and climate change are among the main culprits affecting these groups, as well as the rest of variety of life on Earth.
To raise awareness on the importance of biodiversity, as well as to take actions to preserve it, the United Nations declared 2010 the International Year of Biodiversity (IYB). The later will provide an opportunity for the World to strengthen efforts to understand and preserve biodiversity and the services it provides for human well-being. Even though we have failed to properly administrate the World’s biodiversity, it is our responsibility to study, protect and preserve it for future generations. And this has to be done with urgency!
To read on the IYB, visit: http://www.cbd.int/2010/welcome/



07 December 2009

NEW RESEARCH ON ATRAZINE BRINGS BACK AN AMPHIBIAN ECOLOGICAL ISSUE

Atrazine is a herbicide widely used on crop fields around the World to control broadleaf and grassy weeds. The negative effects that this commonly used agro-chemical pesticide have on frogs received high scientific and general public attention in 2002. Nonetheless, a previous study by Diana et al. (2000) had already highlighted that high concentrations of Atrazine in artificial aquatic communities resulted in frogs with a decrease in length and weight at metamorphosis, which may result in fitness reduction.


The studies by Tyrone Hayes and colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, USA, in 2002, demonstrated that exposure of frogs to low levels of Atrazine induced abnormalities such as retarded development and hermaphroditism. The findings of impaired reproductive function suggested that natural frog populations exposed to this herbicide may suffer declines.  However, investigations by other research teams, including Syngenta, the principal Atrazine registrant, reported no adverse effects.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), based on a review of laboratory and field studies, concluded (2007) that Atrazine does not adversely affect amphibian gonadal development. Beginning this fall (2009), EPA started a comprehensive reevaluation of Atrazine’s ecological effects, including potential effects on amphibians and human health.


Atrazine was recently shown by Suzawa and Ingraham (2008) to potentially disrupt normal endocrine development and function in lower and higher vertebrates. And this month (2009), it was released a study performed by researchers at the University of Otawa, Canada, which found that Atrazine alters the sexual development and had a feminizing effect on studied frogs, resulting in sex ratios favoring females, with a reduced number of males. The issue is back!

30 November 2009

THE AMPHIBIAN ARK





The world’s amphibians are disappearing.  More than one hundred species may have already gone extinct and thousands more are threatened with extinction.  Many of the threatened species cannot be safeguarded in the wild and require ex situ management if they are to persist.  The Amphibian Ark (AArk) draws together diverse stakeholders to save select species until in situ threats can be mitigated.  AArk work includes species conservation needs assessment, husbandry training, capacity building, fostering partnerships, fundraising, and education.

The AArk is a joint effort of three principal partners: the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA), the IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG), and the IUCN/SSC Amphibian Specialist Group (ASG). We were formed in 2005 to address the ex situ components of the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan (ACAP). 
Our vision is The world’s amphibians safe in nature, and our mission is Ensuring the global survival of amphibians, focusing on those that cannot currently be safeguarded in nature.

We help to coordinate ex situ programs implemented by partners around the world, with the first emphasis on programs within the range countries of the species, and with a constant attention to our obligation to couple ex situ conservation measures with necessary efforts to protect or restore species in their natural habitats.



More information about the Amphibian Ark is available on our web site, www.amphibianark.org and we also encourage you to subscribe to our free quarterly electronic newsletter.

Kevin Johnson
Amphibian Ark Communications and Development Officer

BOOK ON LIZARDS FROM SRI LANKA



This is a recent checklist (year 2009) with all the lizard species known to occur in Sri Lanka. There are accounts with pictures and relevant information for each of the species. An illustrated key, showing thumbnail images, facilitates identification of the different taxa. The book completes with a glossary, a gazetteer of localities, an index to scientific names, and a list of references.
Contact: ruchira.somaweera@gmail.com (please notice that this author does not sell copies but could point to several places that do).

28 November 2009

HAWKSBILL TURTLE RESCUED IN THE GULF OF VENEZUELA


A Hawksbill Sea Turtle ("Tortuga Carey", Eretmochelys imbricata) was rescued by the Marine Turtle Work Group of Venezuela’s Gulf -Grupo de Trabajo en Tortugas Marinas del Golfo de Venezuela- (GTTM-GV) at Caimare Chico beach, in the Gulf of Venezuela, last November 16th.
          This reptile was accidentally trapped in a handmade fishing net; the fisherman, who was already aware of the work this group executes, activated the Opportune Information Network – Zulia (RAO-Zulia) that lead the team to its encounter. At present it is very weak, nevertheless it has satisfactorily responded to the rehabilitation process; its physiological conditions are perfectly normal, it has very good appetite and it is hunting little shrimp that are put in its proximity.
         This rescue is extremely special, because it is referred to one of the species of marine turtles (E. imbricata) that are in critic danger of extinction; this is why it is exceedingly important for the GTTM-GV to get this magnificent specimen healthy and release it under the best conditions so that it has higher opportunities of survival. On the other hand, it is repeatedly questioned the reason why this little chelonian was found on the coastal waters of the Venezuelan Gulf.


It is important to highlight that the whole process of rescuing, rehabilitation and immediate reintegration of this specimen within its environment is under this team’s responsibility, and it is supported by the Wash Ashore Attention Network of Zulia State (Minamb, ICLAM, LUZ, InsoPESCA, among others).

Text by Erika Simonaro. 
Source: GTTM-GV 20/11/2009. (gttm-gv@gmail.com, Facebook: GTTM-GV)

     


NEW COURSE ON VENEZUELAN SNAKES


INTRODUCTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE AND CONSERVATION OF VENEZUELAN SNAKES Importance, classification, origin and evolution, morphology, natural history, conservation, Venezuelan Families and Genera, importance of Internet and photography.
Language: Spanish
Place: Auditorium Sociedad de Ciencias, El Marqués, Caracas, Venezuela.
Date: Saturday 23 January 2010
Contact: info@serpientesdevenezuela.net

25 November 2009

CONSERVATION HOPE FOR THE CRITICALLY ENDANGERED SIAMESE CROCODILE



The Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) is a Critically Endangered species with small populations living in continental Southeast Asia and the islands of Java and Borneo. The species no longer occurs in the vast majority of its former range: it was hunted in so large numbers that it was declared as “Extinct in the wild” by the 1992 IUCN Crocodile Action Plan.


Some threats to the species are captures in the wild, river hydroelectric projects, and increasing human pressure on natural habitats. There are some specimens in captivity, but most of them are hybrids.
This year, DNA analyses revealed that 35 crocs of the 69 rescued crocodiles at the Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Centre, in Cambodia, were pure breed Siamese crocs. The finding is thought to be critical for the long-term preservation of the species, through a captive breeding program and later release of offspring in suitable natural habitats. Fauna & Flora International, the Cambodian Forestry Administration, and Wildlife Alliance are providing technical support for this task. This action will start in 2010; but, since sexual maturation of the species is slow, it will take more than a decade before the program yields more positive results.


We thank Fauna & Flora International and the Cambodian Crocodile Conservation Programme for allowing use of the photos shown here.
Read more on this story at: www.fauna&flora.org: Siamese_crocs

21 November 2009

200+ visitors during first month


MANY THANKS FOR VISITING THE BLOG! WE REACHED NOW MORE THAN 200 VISITORS FROM 30 COUNTRIES IN OUR FIRST MONTH!

¡MUCHAS GRACIAS POR VISITAR EL BLOG! ¡AHORA ALCANZAMOS MÁS DE 200 VISITANTES DESDE 30 PAÍSES EN NUESTO PRIMER MES!

18 November 2009

NEW BOOK ON AMPHIBIANS



AMPHIBIANS OF VENEZUELA: state of knowledge and recommendations to its conservation (In Spanish)

This document is the first intent to evaluate the state of knowledge, and to identify and order the country’s need in matter of conservation of amphibians.
Contact: josefa.senaris @fundacionlasalle.org.ve

15 November 2009

FRESWATER TURTLES AND TORTOISES ACCOUNTS



The IUCN/SSC Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group is engaged in a long term conservation project dealing with all extant freshwater turtles and tortoises in the world. Species accounts have already been prepared for 31 species involving 73 Nations and Territories where they occur. Published accounts (last one released on 13 November 2009) are available at: http://www.iucn-tftsg.org/

14 November 2009

NEW BOOK ON SERPENTES

GUIDE TO THE SNAKES OF VENEZUELA: Biology, venoms, conservation and species list.
A full-color illustrated guide to the snakes of Venezuela (103 pages, In Spanish).
Available from: Luis Fernando Navarrete: herpetoamigo@gmail.com

07 November 2009

NEW SYMPOSIUM ON SNAKE VENOM AND SNAKEBITE (IN NORTHEASTERN INDIA)



The symposium on “Recent Advances in Research on Snake Venom and Snakebite Therapy: National and International Perspectives (SnakSymp-09)” is scheduled to be held in Tezpur, Assam, India, from 18 to 19 December 2009.  
The symposium will be attended by many renowned toxinologists and physicians of India and abroad.   For more information contact: snaksymp@gmail.com

06 November 2009

AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE CRISIS. LATEST UPDATE

The 2009 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ shows that 17,291 species out of the 47,677 assessed species are threatened with extinction. Craig Hilton-Taylor, Manager of the IUCN Red List Unit, says “these results are just the tip of the iceberg. We have only managed to assess 47,663 species so far; there are many more millions out there which could be under serious threat".


The IUCN results reveal that 30 percent of all known amphibians, and 28 percent of reptiles assessed so far are under threat.
Of the 1,677 reptiles on the IUCN Red List, 469 are threatened with extinction and 22 are already Extinct or Extinct in the Wild.
The IUCN Red List shows that “1,895 of the planet’s 6,285 amphibians are in danger of extinction, making them the most threatened group of species known to date. Of these, 39 are already Extinct or Extinct in the Wild, 484 are Critically Endangered, 754 are Endangered and 657 are Vulnerable”.

04 November 2009

TAPROBANICA




Taprobanica, the Journal of South Asian Biodiversity, launched in April 2009, publishes original papers, notes, and essays on South Asian biodiversity topics, with special attention to Sri Lanka and the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot. The first number featured almost 60% of papers on amphibians and reptiles. The second number is scheduled to appear in November 2009.   

01 November 2009

AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE HIGH DIVERSITY IN THE GAMBA COMPLEX OF GABON, AFRICA



The Gamba Complex in Gabon, is a national protected wildland mosaic, mix of tropical forest, savanna, fresh water, and marine environments. It holds a high diversity of amphibians (75 species) and reptiles (84 species; including 11 turtles, 3 crocodiles, 2 amphisbaenians, 23 lizards, and 49 snakes), by far the richest herpetofauna assemblage for this African country. Although the herpetofauna of Gabon is very rich, it is also one of the least known and potentially one of the most endangered.
Learn more at: MABinGabon/biodiversity

30 October 2009

NEW SYMPOSIUM IN COLOMBIA


I Symposium of herpetology in the Chocó Biogeografico; Amphibians and reptiles: "Past, present and future of herpetology research in the region".
To be held in Quibdó, Colombia, 25 to 27 November 2009.
Language of symposium: Spanish
Contact: simposioherpetologia@utch.edu.col; Tel.: 6710237 ext. 232

29 October 2009

NEW WEB SITE: HERPETOTROPICOS


HERPETOTROPICOS announces the launching of a new web site for the journal. Please follow this link:
If you have an article on tropical herpetofauna, please consider sending your valuable contribution to the only scientific journal dealing exclusively with tropical amphibians and reptiles. Please find instructions on the web site.

24 October 2009

CALL FOR PAPERS


HERPETOTROPICOS is seeking original contributions on subjects pertaining to tropical amphibians and reptiles. If you have a potential article, please contact: editor@herpetotropicos.org

HERPETOTROPICOS

Herpetotropicos is an international peer-reviewed, indexed and open access scientific journal, launched in 2004, specially devoted to tropical amphibians and reptiles from all over the World. The official languages are English and Spanish (with abstracts and legends to figures and tables in both languages). The journal publishes two issues per year. In addition to the printed edition (ISSN 1690-7930), there is a simultaneous online edition (ISSN 1856-9285). Authors are permitted to distribute, for private uses, printed copies of their published articles, as well as to post final pdf’s on a personal website, an institutional repository, or any other free public server. Herpetotropicos currently make efforts to increase both the authorship and readership of the journal in tropical countries.

Blog Archive