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25 August 2010

NEW TROPICAL FROG SPECIES, AMONG THE SMALLEST IN THE WORLD



The tiny frog (known adults between 10.6 and 12.8 mm; about the size of a pea) was discovered by Dr. Indraneil Das and Dr. Alexander Haas in the forests of the Matang Range, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. the description appeared this month in the journal  Zootaxa. Dr. Indraneil Das is leading a team within the Lost Frogs Campaing, of Conservation International. 
The frog lives in close association with a pitcher plant (Nepenthes ampullaria) from which the species takes the name (Microhyla nepenthicola).  The larvae of this frog develop inside these plants, after the frogs deposit the eggs on the sides of the pitcher. 
As in similar situations around the tropics, scientists who saw specimens of this frog in the past thought they were juveniles of another species. 

23 August 2010

2600 VISITORS!

Herpetotropicos has reached more than 2600 visitors from 970 cities in 87 countries. Thanks to all followers of this blog.

THE SEARCH FOR LOST AMPHIBIANS

Conservation International is supporting expeditions to search some amphibian species  that haven’t been seen for more than a decade. Scientists are optimistic about the prospect of at least one rediscovery during this campaing.  
The search is taking place in 18 countries accross Latin America, Africa and Asia, and it is 
the first ever coordinated effort to find such a large number of "lost" 
frogs. There is a list of the "top 10" species of  the 100 being searched believed to be particularly exciting to find. The top 10 are: the golden toad (Incilius periglenes), the gastric broofing frog (Rhebatrachus vitellinus), the Mesopotamia beaked toad (Rhinella rostrata), the Jackson´s climbing salander (Bolitoglossa jacksoni), the African painted frog (Callixalus pictus), the Río Pescado Stubfoot toad (Atelopus balios), the scarlet frog (Atelopus sorianoi; depicted here), the Hula painted frog (Discoglossus nigriventer), the Sambas stream toad (Ansonia latidisca), and the Turkestanian salamander (Hynobius turkestanicus).

For more information, clik here: Search for lost amphibians.


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