Translate

22 February 2010

RE-DISCOVERER OF THE SIAMESE CROC RECEIVED ROYAL AWARD


Dr Jenny Daltry has been actively involved in conservation of wildlife and environments in Cambodia. For her achievements, she has recently been given a Royal award by the Government of Cambodia. In the year 2000 she re-discovered the Siamese crocodile (a species previously thought to be extinct in the wild; see our previous blog, dated Nov 25, 2009) and is leading a community-based programme to preserve this Critically Endangered Crocodylus. She has also been involved in the protection of more than a million hectares of the biodiverse Cardamom Mountains.

Drt. Daltry is a Senior Conservation Biologist for the international conservation organization Fauna & Flora International. Among her achievements in Cambodia are the creation of the first permanent Masters of Science programme at the Royal University of Phnom Penh, and the creation and chief editing of Cambodia’s first peer-reviewed scientific journal (the Cambodian Journal of
Natural History). 

SPECIES OF THE DAY: THE CHINESE ALLIGATOR

One of the most endangered crocodilians, the Chinese alligator (Alligator sinesis) is also one of the smallest (about 2 m long). This relative of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) has a geographic distribution restricted to the lower Yangtze River region in China. Habitat destruction by human pressure for agriculture has been considered the major cause of the species’ decline. It is listed as “Critically Endangered” since it has suffered a drastic decline in numbers of wild individuals (estimated to be less than 150) and the extant populations hold less than 10 individuals each. However, about 10,000 specimens are currently being reared in captivity and are a source of hope for the long-term survival of the species through reintroductions in the wild.
To learn more about this species, visit the "Species of the Day" section at the rigth column of this blog, below our statistics gadget, or visit the official IUCN website

Blog Archive