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14 May 2011

CROCODYLES IN THE SAHARA DESERT



Crocodylus niloticus has experienced local extinctions throughout the Sahara desert, because of increasing aridity and human interventionHowever, relict populations still persist in Chad, Egypt and Mauritania.  A new study evaluates the status of the Saharan crocodiles and provides new data for Mauritania to assist conservation planning. 

09 May 2011

TOP 100 EVOLUTIONARY DISTINCT AND GLOBALLY ENDANGERED AMPHIBIANS

Know HERE100 extraordinary amphibians threatened with 
extinction!

A NEW SPECIES OF BLIND AND LIMBLESS LIZARD FROM CAMBODIA





The Dalai Mountain blind lizard (Dibamus dalaiensisis a new species to science, coming from the biodiversity hotpot named the Cardamom mountains, in Cambodia. It it the first of its genus and family to be found in this country.  These lizards are blind and without extremities to walk, and have fossorial (live underground) habits. Find more in: cambodian-scientist-discovers-new-species-of-blind-and-legless-lizard/

08 May 2011

ATELOPUS BALIOS REDISCOVERED

Conservation International says: "Atelopus balios
Last seen 1995. Rediscovered after 15 years in Ecuador by Eduardo Toral-Contreras and Elicio Tapia. Researchers feared that the deadly amphibian Chytrid fungus had wiped out this species along with many other closely related species in Ecuador. This find is significant and very encouraging, offering an opportunity to protect this attractive and rare species".
Check web site in English. Lea más en Español.

01 May 2011

GIANT VARANUS, ANOTHER 2010 DISCOVERY FROM SOUTHEAST ASIA


A large (2 m long) lizard, cousin of the komodo dragon inhabiting an island in the Philippines, Varanus bitatawa, made a stunning discovery adding to the 2010 International Year of Biodiversity. It is a secretive, frugivorous, forest monitor lizard from a forest in northern Philippines. Data from DNA, and morphology, demonstrated its taxonomic distinctiveness and revealed its close relationship to Varanus olivaceus (from southern Luzon and nearby islands). The new species appears to be restricted to forests of the central and northern Sierra Madre mountain range. Its discovery identified a seldom-perceived biogeographic boundary and emphasized the need for continued biodiversity research in the megadiverse conservation hotspot of the Philippines. 

ANOTHER NEW SPECIES DISCOVERED DURING THE INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF BIODIVERSITY (2010) WAS VIETNAMESE, TOO


It is a lizard named Leiolepis ngovantrii, with populations made up of only female individuals (thus parthenogenetic, asexual), found in Binh Chau – Phuoc Buu Nature Reserve, Xuyen Moc district, BaRia-Vung Tau Province, Vietnam. It was long time unnoticed to science in spite of inhabiting a heavily populated area and being eaten in local restaurants. Its pattern of coloration provides camouflage in the coastal sandy places they inhabit, as well as under mangrove forests during the dry season.  

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